Good Morning Girl

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‘Good Morning Girl’ – Single Version (1966)

Lyrics

Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
But I can't pass this time of day

'Cause I'm on my way to rest my head
And I've lost the mind that I used to have
And I don't have a dime to spare

Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
But I can't pass this time of day

So go tell the man that collects the dues
That you saw a guy without any shoes
Who would do the job if he was built that way

Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
But I can't pass this time of day, no
I can't pass this time of day

'Cause I'm on my way to rest my head
And I've lost the mind that I used to have
I don't have a dime to spare

Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
But I can't pass this time of day

So go tell the man that collects the dues
That you saw a guy without any shoes
Who would do the job if he was built that way

Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
But I can't pass this time of day, no
I can't pass this time of day

B_Side_Big

Together with his new band The Buzz David Bowie recorded ‘Good Morning Girl’ on 7 March 1966 as the B-side to his new single ‘Do Anything You Say’. Bowie’s second Pye Records single was released on 1 April that year.

The song’s title is a reference to The Yardbirds’ version of Sonny Boy Williamson’s ‘Good Morning Little Schoolgirl’ which was also covered later by no other than Rod Stewart. Except for the title these two songs bear no real resemblance. In contrast to the rather messy ‘Do Anything You Say’ the single’s B-side is heavily influenced by jazzy melodic changes such as the switching between the first and the fourth chords. Peter Doggett, author of the book The Man who sold the World, suggests that thus the song was rather tailored towards the “cooler end” of London’s mod club scene.

‘Good Morning Girl’ had better been chosen as the single’s A-side instead of ‘Do Anything You Say’ as it is much stronger musically. Bowie even provides a superb vocal performance with some really acing scat vocals when it comes to the recurring guitar solo part of the song. However, ‘Good Morning Girl’ marked an end to Bowie’s explorations of jazz for the foreseeable future. There were only a handful of instances over the following decades of his career in which David Bowie would return to endorse jazzy tunes. The next time he would produce a full jazz-influenced album would be 1993′s Black Tie White Noise.

Tied together with ‘Do Anything You Say’ the single was yet another commercial failure for Bowie and The Buzz as the single failed to chart upon its release on 1 April 1966. Despite that ‘Good Morning Girl’ remained part of further live performances by Bowie and his band throughout the year.

——

Discography

Single Version:

  • Vinyl ‘Do Anything You Say’ (A-Side) / ‘Good Morning Girl’ (B-Side) 4/1966
  • CD Early On (1964-1966) 1991
  • Vinyl I Dig Everything: The 1966 Pye Singles 1999

——

Musicians

  • David Bowie (vocals, guitar, saxophone)
  • John Hutchinson (guitar)
  • Derek Boyes (keyboard)
  • Derek Fearnley (bass)
  • John Eager (drums)
  • Produced by Tony Hatch
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Filed under 1966: Bowie & The Buzz

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