Tag Archives: B-Sides

The London Boys


iii

Lyrics

ii

iii

iii

 

 

Leave a comment

Filed under 1966: Bowie & The Buzz, 2000: Toy Sessions

I’m Not Losing Sleep


David+Bowie+Bowie

‘I’m Not Losing Sleep’ – Single Version (1966)

Lyrics

Yes, I've read the morning papers
Telling me that you've made money
Do you think I'm gonna crawl, then think again

Though I'm dressed in rags, I'm richer
Though I eat from tins, I'm healthier
Though I live in slums, I'm purer than you, my friend

Too bad, I'm not losing sleep
[Too bad] I'm just counting sheep
[Too bad] I'm not losing sleep, my friend

Look around and see the friends
The ones you left, our friends deserted
See the guys that used to talk and drink with you

Don't look down your nose at me
'Cause I won't ask your sympathy
I won't be your yes-sir man for anything

Too bad, I'm not losing sleep
[Too bad] I'm just counting sheep
[Too bad] I'm not losing sleep, my friend

I would walk with you
Talk with you, drink with you
If you drop that halo that you're wearing on the ground

Too bad, I'm not losing sleep
[Too bad] I'm just counting sheep
[Too bad] I'm not losing sleep, my friend

I can get my satisfaction
Knowing you won't get reaction
What makes me the big attraction anyway

It's too bad, I'm not losing sleep
[Too bad] I'm just counting sheep
[Too bad] I'm not losing sleep, my friend

Too bad, I'm not losing sleep
[Too bad] I'm just counting sheep
[Too bad] I'm not losing sleep, my friend

Oh, it's too bad, I'm not losing sleep
[Too bad] I'm just counting sheep
[Too bad] I'm not losing sleep, my friend

Big_B

The B-Side to 1966’s ‘I Dig Everything’ welcomes Anthony Newley’s influence to Bowie’s vocal style – a style which would feature in a major way on his first album David Bowie. Bowie and Tony Hatch recorded this song on 5th July 1966 with an ensemble of unknown musicians (they weren’t documented for the recording) – excluding Bowie’s actual, but slightly inexperienced band in terms of musical arrangements, The Buzz.

Though ‘I’m Not Losing Sleep’ cannot be classified as a pure vaudeville-type Newley song, Bowie did try out the showman’s vocal swagger in some parts of this song. But there’s a bit more to this unfairly judged B-Side.

First of all, the song features someone who is totally content in his current socioeconomic status. He basically sings about a friend leaving his poorer background because he started making money and now hangs out with the richer class. But Bowie seems to be quite fond of the fact that he is where he is instead of his friend who makes money. He even gives a little nod to The Rolling Stones, turning their one-year old hit a bit around: “I can get my satisfaction / knowing you won’t get reaction”. So there’s a man who appears to be all satisfied that he is poor.

Furthermore, ‘I’m Not Losing Sleep’ is slightly remiscent of Petula Clark’s hit ‘Downtown’: the ‘too bad’* backing chorus sounds very similar. However, Bowie structured the song much in the Motown tradition using a recurrent shift between the tonic and the minor 2nd chords which portrays ambition. Considering that Bowie partly used the Newley voice (pay attention to the songs ‘middle eight’ section when he sings “on the ground”) it can be said that ‘I’m Not Losing Sleep’ can be described as a song where once again Bowie tried out a lot of musical influences.

Contrary to many other Bowie biographers and writers I find ‘I’m Not Losing Sleep’ to be a good song that is up to the standard of the scene back in the day.

zHiZ5

* Funnily, Bowie’s early publisher Sparta released ‘I’m Not Losing Sleep’ under the title ‘Too Bad’.

——

Discography

Single Version:

  • Vinyl I Dig Everything (A-Side) / I’m Not Losing Sleep (B-Side) 8/1966
  • CD Early On (1964-1966) 1991
  • Vinyl I Dig Everything: The 1966 Pye Singles EP 1999

——

Musicians

  • David Bowie (vocal)
  • Session musicans unknown
  • Produced by Tony Hatch

Leave a comment

Filed under 1966: Bowie & The Buzz

Good Morning Girl


tumblr_l89e18CCdy1qc7qvfo1_250

‘Good Morning Girl’ – Single Version (1966)

Lyrics

Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
But I can't pass this time of day

'Cause I'm on my way to rest my head
And I've lost the mind that I used to have
And I don't have a dime to spare

Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
But I can't pass this time of day

So go tell the man that collects the dues
That you saw a guy without any shoes
Who would do the job if he was built that way

Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
But I can't pass this time of day, no
I can't pass this time of day

'Cause I'm on my way to rest my head
And I've lost the mind that I used to have
I don't have a dime to spare

Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
But I can't pass this time of day

So go tell the man that collects the dues
That you saw a guy without any shoes
Who would do the job if he was built that way

Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
Hey, hey, good morning girl
But I can't pass this time of day, no
I can't pass this time of day

B_Side_Big

Together with his new band The Buzz David Bowie recorded ‘Good Morning Girl’ on 7 March 1966 as the B-side to his new single ‘Do Anything You Say’. Bowie’s second Pye Records single was released on 1 April that year.

The song’s title is a reference to The Yardbirds’ version of Sonny Boy Williamson’s ‘Good Morning Little Schoolgirl’ which was also covered later by no other than Rod Stewart. Except for the title these two songs bear no real resemblance. In contrast to the rather messy ‘Do Anything You Say’ the single’s B-side is heavily influenced by jazzy melodic changes such as the switching between the first and the fourth chords. Peter Doggett, author of the book The Man who sold the World, suggests that thus the song was rather tailored towards the “cooler end” of London’s mod club scene.

‘Good Morning Girl’ had better been chosen as the single’s A-side instead of ‘Do Anything You Say’ as it is much stronger musically. Bowie even provides a superb vocal performance with some really acing scat vocals when it comes to the recurring guitar solo part of the song. However, ‘Good Morning Girl’ marked an end to Bowie’s explorations of jazz for the foreseeable future. There were only a handful of instances over the following decades of his career in which David Bowie would return to endorse jazzy tunes. The next time he would produce a full jazz-influenced album would be 1993′s Black Tie White Noise.

Tied together with ‘Do Anything You Say’ the single was yet another commercial failure for Bowie and The Buzz as the single failed to chart upon its release on 1 April 1966. Despite that ‘Good Morning Girl’ remained part of further live performances by Bowie and his band throughout the year.

——

Discography

Single Version:

  • Vinyl ‘Do Anything You Say’ (A-Side) / ‘Good Morning Girl’ (B-Side) 4/1966
  • CD Early On (1964-1966) 1991
  • Vinyl I Dig Everything: The 1966 Pye Singles 1999

——

Musicians

  • David Bowie (vocals, guitar, saxophone)
  • John Hutchinson (guitar)
  • Derek Boyes (keyboard)
  • Derek Fearnley (bass)
  • John Eager (drums)
  • Produced by Tony Hatch

Leave a comment

Filed under 1966: Bowie & The Buzz

And I Say To Myself


david-bowie_1966.jpg?w=385&h=240

‘And I Say To Myself’ – Single Version (1966)

Lyrics

And I say to myself
I've got it wrong, wrong, wrong
She is a play-girl
She the wrong wrong girl for me
And I say to myself
You're a fool, fool, fool
She doesn't love you
She doesn't need you, this I know

She's got a trail of men that she takes
Wherever she goes
She hasn't the strength to love any single man for a length of time

[And I say to myself]
Ooh, I don't stand a chance
[And I say to myself]
It's a long long romance
[And I say to myself]
Well, she's out to slay
[And I say to myself]
Well, she's got it made
[And I say to myself]
Oh yeah, oh yeah
[And I say to myself]
Oh yeah

And I say to myself that she shouldn't love anybody else in the world but me
And I say to myself
Forget her now, now, now
She don't want you
She don't love you anymore
And I say to myself you're a fool, fool, fool
She's don't love you
She don't need you, this I know

And I turn around and look at myself
You'll never get her, you're a fool
Say after me I'm a fool- I'm a fool

[And I say to myself]
I can't get what I want
[And I say to myself]
And it makes me sad
[And I say to myself]
I can't get what I want
[And I say to myself]
And it makes me mad
[And I say to myself]
Oh yeah, oh yeah
[And I say to myself]
Oh yeah

And I say to myself that she shouldn't love anybody else in the world but me,
yeah
Yeah

[And I say to myself]
Oh, I feel so sad
[And I say to myself]
She's making me mad
[And I say to myself]
And I say to myself
[And I say to myself]
That I love her
[And I say to myself]
And I say to myself that I need her
[And I say to myself]
Oh, I need her

And I say to myself I'm a fool
And I say to myself

AndISay_Big

Released as the B-side to the ‘Can’t Help Thinking About Me’ single on 14 January 1966, ‘And I Say To Myself’ is a rather quiet and harmonious little piece differing both in sound and quality to the superior A-side.

Recorded together with ‘Can’t Help Thinking About Me’ on 25 November 1965 at Pye Studios and produced by Tony Hatch, this song has some resemblance with a Bowie-demo discussed earlier on this blog: ‘Glad I’ve Got Nobody’. Both the chord and the style are similar to the demo. The beginninng of the song starts with some promising chromatic harmonic changes as heard in some Beatles songs. The song goes on and shows that its roots must also be in the doo-wop vocal harmony of the 1950s. Vocal inspiration came as well from the Motown sound and  the style of The Righteous Brothers and Marvin Gaye. Nicholas Pegg assumes that ‘And I Say To Myself’ adapted the chords used in Cooke’s ‘Wonderful World’. Bowie’s vocals on this record are a true improvement over earlier recordings. They are worthy matching them against Marvin Gaye in parts.

One major setback of the song is the less intriguing lyrical composition. The song is about a relationship with a rich girl. She does not like him as much as he likes her. The rich girl might perhaps be a reference to the more aristocratic early Bowie girlfriend Dana Gillespee. Hence, the song would hint at Bowie’s class-conscience.

What all these influences show is that David Bowie did not know where to go with his musical studies. Midway through this song it is not really possible to detect a sort of sense of direction that the song might take. It’s not one of the worst songs of early Bowie – by far not. But in my opinion, it remains one of the less interesting songs.

——

Discography

Single Version:

  • Vinyl ‘Can’t Help Thinking About Me’ (A-Side) / ‘And I Say To Myself’ (B-Side) 1/1966
  • CD Early On (1964-1966) 1991
  • Vinyl I Dig Everything: The 1966 Pye Singles 1999

——

Musicians

  • David Bowie (vocals, guitar, saxophone)
  • Dennis Taylor (guitar)
  • Graham Rivens (bass)
  • Phil Lancaster (drums)
  • Produced by Tony Hatch

Leave a comment

Filed under 1965-66: Davy Jones & The Lower Third

Baby Loves That Way


 

bowie65-joesalamavideo.jpg?w=500

‘Baby Loves That Way’ – Single Version (1965)

Lyrics

[Baby loves that way]
Yes, she does, yes, she does
[Baby loves that way]
Oh, I love my baby
[Baby loves that way]
Ooh, I gotta take her
[Baby loves that way]
Yep, I love her

Baby likes to go outside, so I let her
Wants to fool with other guys, so I let her
Wants to be bad, so I let her be bad
But fooling around, it will make me sad
She fools around with other boys and treat me like an unwanted toy

[Baby loves that way]
Oh, I love my baby
[Baby loves that way]
Ooh, she does too much to me
[Baby loves that way]
And I can't think too much of her
[Baby loves that way]
Gotta take her, gotta take her

Gonna better leave her alone, put you down son
Treating her real fine, thus I'm home being a loner
Jeanny's my babe and that's alright, yeah
She treats me good, each and every night
She fools around with other boys and treat me like an unwanted toy

[Baby loves that way]
I love my baby
[Baby loves that way]
Ooh, she's too much
[Baby loves that way]
Yes she does, yes she does
[Baby loves that way]

[Baby loves that way]
I love my baby
[Baby loves that way]
Yeah, she's too much, yeah yeah
[Baby loves that way]
Ooh, I think she can live with me
[Baby loves that way]
Love her, love her, love her

Baby likes to go outside, so I let her
Wants to fool with other guys, so I let her
Wants to be bad, so I let her be bad
But fooling around, it will make me sad
She clings around with all the boys, who treat her like unwanted toys

[Baby loves that way]
Obviously this is the end
[Baby loves that way]
Gotta take her
[Baby loves that way]
Ooh yeah
[Baby loves that way]
Can't do enough
[Baby loves that way]

BabyLoves_big

‘Baby Loves That Way’ was released on 20 August 1965 as the B-side of the single ‘You’ve Got A Habit Of Leaving’, the first single to come out by his then-band The Lower Third. The song was recorded during the same session when the singles A-side was recorded some time during July that year. The single was not immediately released after the recordings due to some disagreements between Bowie and producer Shel Talmy.

While the A-side is a direct homage to The Who and The Kinks, the B-side is rather leaning towards the harmonious melodies of the Herman’s Hermits. The band’s lead singer Peter Noone would later on, in 1971, be helpful to launch Bowie’s career when he covered ‘Oh! You Pretty Things’ and landed a high charting success with his cover.

The song starts off with variations on D and bursts into a repeating question-and-answer game between the backing vocals’ “Baby loves that way” and David’s solo parts where he tells the story about his flirtatious girl seeking the attention of other boys. Legend has it that, among others, both Shel Talmy and Leslie Conn provided the backing vocals for the “monastic chanting, perhaps the earliest intimation of a Buddhist motif in David’s music”, as Nicholas Pegg (author of the wonderful The Complete David Bowie) suggests. According to Cann’s similarly great Any Day Now it is known that David had an idea for the backing vocals to sound like monks’ chants, however the idea was apparently dismissed. Feel free to comment on this issue! What’s your take on this?

DavidBowie1965homemoviefootagexsxsxsxs

The lyrics of this song foresee David’s sex life in the years to come as he apparently comes to terms with his girl teasing and flirting (and doing what else) with other boys when she is going out on her own. David and Angie had worked out something similarly in their complicated relationships that started just a couple of years after the release of this single.

I think ‘Baby Loves That Way’ is superior to the single’s A-side because it simply sounds more harmonious and more ’rounded’ in a way. And in my opinion it ranks among the best he has brought up until late 1965 (though it’s been only three singles until then). It easily ranks above the ‘Liza Jane’ single and is about as good as ‘I Pity The Fool’.

Like he did with many of his early songs David Bowie re-recorded ‘Baby Loves That Way’ in 2000 for his planned (but not officially released) album Toy in a new extended version which comes across very harmonious, calmed and way slower than the original version. The new version of 4’32” features Bowie with completely non-typical vocals: somewhat boring, calm and dominated by the longer instrumental part of the song. Here is how the extended version sounds:

‘Baby Loves That Way’ – Toy, unreleased (ca. 2000)

——

Discography

Single Version:

  • Vinyl You’ve Got A Habit Of Leaving (A-Side) / Baby Loves That Way (B-Side) 8/1965
  • Vinyl The Manish Boys / Davy Jones & The Lower 3rd EP 1979
  • CD Early On (1964-1966) 1991
  • Vinyl Bowie 1965! EP 2013

Extended Version:

  • Toy Sessions unreleased
  • CD Slow Burn EP 2002 (Japan)
  • CD Everyone Says ‘Hi’ EP 2002 (UK)
  • CD Everyone Says ‘Hi’ EP 2002 (Austria)

——

Musicians

  • Davy Jones (vocal, harmonica)
  • Denis Taylor (guitar, vocal)
  • Graham Rivens (bass)
  • Phil Lancaster (drums)
  • Nicky Hopkins (piano)
  • Shel Talmy, Les Conn (backing vocal)
  • Glyn Johns (backing vocal)
  • Produced by Shel Talmy

2 Comments

Filed under 1965-66: Davy Jones & The Lower Third, 2000: Toy Sessions

Take My Tip


 

manish 1

‘Take My Tip’ – Single Version (1965)

Lyrics

You think you're gonna please her
So you walk right up and tease her
But she walks right on by
You're scared to walk beside her
'Cause you're playing with the spider who possess the sky
She got the green backs, my-oh-my
You gotta act tall, think big, if you wanna make a mark in her book
Gotta get ahead, get a car, fancy clothes
Or she'll throw you right off her hook
Here's the news- you are but one fish in her back garden scene
Gonna make like a shark to be free
Something bad on your mind
Take my tip- get on out
Take my tip- get on out

You can't give all you got to take something back
Before she'll put you right up on her rack
With some others in mind
Take my tip- get on out
Take my tip- get on out

You think you're gonna please her
So you walk right up and tease her
But she walks right on by
You're scared to walk beside her
'Cause you're playing with the tiger who possess the sky
She got the green backs, my-oh-my
You gotta act tall, think big, if you wanna make a mark in her book
Gotta get ahead, get a car, fancy clothes
Or she'll throw you right off her hook
Here's the news- you are but one fish in her back garden scene
Gonna make like a shark to be free
Something bad on your mind
Get it off, take my tip
Get it off, take my tip

You can't give all you have to take something back
Before she'll put you right up on the rack
With some others in mind
Take my tip- get on out
Take my tip- get on out
Take my tip- get on out
Take my tip- get on out

Take My Tip B

Nerds gather around, here’s some Bowie trivia: ‘Take My Tip’, the B-side to the single ‘I Pity The Fool’ (released 5th March 1965 under the EMI Parlophone label), has found its mark in Bowie history for two reasons. First, the song is the first-ever published song which was written and composed by young David Bowie (aka David Jones). Second, ‘Take My Tip’ was also the first-ever Bowie song to be covered: even before The Manish Boys began recording the single in January 1965 Shel Talmy, the band’s producer, had already envisaged this song to be recorded by American actor Kenny Miller who wanted to make it big in the UK pop scene. ‘Take My Tip’ would become the B-side of his single ‘Restless’ which was recorded in February 1965.

Like ‘I Pity The Fool’ the B-Side features a nice riff from guest guitarist Jimmy Page. But unlike ‘I Pity The Fool’ the B-Side did not lean on American soul music, but rather on American jazzy types such as John Hendricks, Oscar Brown or even the British singer Georgia Fame. ‘Take My Tip’ starts off quite originally with a clunky chord sequence which was only driven by the lyrics that actually become vivid as the song moves on.

Due to time constraints, both songs, ‘I Pity The Fool’ and ‘Take My Tip’, were recorded only twice on 15th January. Hence, for both songs two versions exist. Funnily, in one version of ‘Take My Tip’ Bowie makes a mistake – but let’s hear it from organist Bob Solly who told Record Collector in 2000 the following:

Davie fluffs his own line on that song. What should have been “spider who possesses the sky” came out as “bider who possesses the sky”! It didn’t really matter; the lyrics were secondary in those days.

For the official release, however, the fluffed version was chosen. The ‘flawless’ demo version which first appeared on the Early On compilation in 1991 can be heard here:

‘Take My Tip’ – Alternate Take

image-8-for-david-bowie-at-65-gallery-940469019

——

Discography

Single Version:

  • Vinyl I Pity The Fool (A-Side) / Take My Tip (B-Side) 3/1965
  • Vinyl The Manish Boys / Davy Jones & The Lower 3rd EP 1979
  • Vinyl Bowie 1965! EP 2013

Alternate Vocal:

  • CD Early On (1964-1966) 1991

——

Musicians

  • Davie Jones (vocal, alto saxophone)
  • Paul Rodriguez (tenor saxophone, trumpet)
  • Woolf Byrne (baritone saxophone)
  • Johnny Flux (lead guitar)
  • Bob Solly (keyboards)
  • John Watson (bass)
  • Mick White (drums)
  • Jimmy Page (lead guitar)
  • Produced by Shel Talmy

Leave a comment

Filed under 1963-65: Early Songs

Louie, Louie Go Home


VARIOUS

‘Louie, Louie Go Home’ – Single Version (1964)

Lyrics (Revere/Lindsay)

Well, I- well, I left my wife and child
[Louie, go back home]
Yeah, my conscience is about to drive me wild, yeah
[Louie, go back home]
A little voice inside my head goes on and on
[Louie, go back home]
It says "Louie, Louie, Louie
You better come back home"

Well I, well I thought "I make it by myself", yeah
[Louie, go back home]
Oh, but my baby, she's got my heart a-upon the shelve
[Louie, go back home]
Well I, well I can still hear her moaning
[Louie, go back home]
They're crying "Louie, Louie, Louie
You better go back home"

You better go back home, yeah
You better go back home, yeah
You better go back home
Oh yeah, you better go back home

You better go back a-ho a-ho a-home, a-home yeah yeah
Home-a-home-a-home
Just a-go back a-home a-home a-home
Driving home, yeah, home

Just a little bit louder now
[Just a little bit louder]
Just a little bit louder now
[Just a little bit louder]
Just a little bit louder
[Just a little bit louder]
Well, I'm going home
[Just a little bit louder]
Well, I'm a-going home, yeah
Ooh, I'm a-gonna back, back, back, back, back to my home
Yeah home
Home sweet home
I'm a-gonna back home, ooh

I'm going home, yeah
I'm going home, yeah
I'm going home, yeah
I'm going home, yeah
Back to my baby
Back to where they need me

Liza Jane Single B

‘Louie, Louie Go Home’ was recorded during the same 7-hour session when ‘Liza Jane’ was recorded and was originally scheduled as the A-side of Bowie’s first single. It is a cover version of ‘Louie Go Home’ by Paul Revere & The Raiders, also released in 1964. Davie Jones & The King Bees surprisingly had the opportunity to be the first to get that brand new track – most likely via good business connections of their producer Leslie Conn.

At that time, The Raiders were fairly well known in the U.S., but they hadn’t made a name in the UK yet. The Raiders version itself, a New Orleans style R&B-piece, was some kind of cover of the commercially successful Kingsmen song ‘Louie Louie’ which entered the market shelves roughly around the same time. The Raiders version is based on the piano, and it works well in that way. Unfortunately, the same cannot necessarily be said about the King Bees version.

kingbees

While the A-Side ‘Liza Jane’ can be stylistically rather attributed to the style of the Rolling Stones, the musical influence of ‘Louie, Louie Go Home’ seems to stem more from the Beatles. This also fits with the nature of the song, a question-and-answer piece – sometimes quiet, sometimes loud – adjusted at various points to shake up the listening audience.

But the Davie Jones and the King Bees planned that song without the piano, and it thus ‘Louie, Louie Go Home’ sounds somehow cumbersome – especially because of the screamy and somewhat fragile vocals of young Davie Jones whose lead vocals, in my opinion, somehow don’t manage to make the song effective.

Bowie King Bees 5

——

Discography

  • Vinyl Liza Jane (A-Side) / Louie, Louie Go Home (B-Side) 6/1964
  • CD Early On (1964-1966) 1991

——

Musicians

  • Davie Jones (vocal, tenor sax)
  • George Underwood (rhythm guitar, harmonica, vocal)
  • Roger Bluck (lead guitar)
  • Dave Howard (bass)
  • Robert Allen (drums)
  • Produced by Leslie Conn

Leave a comment

Filed under 1963-65: Early Songs